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One Week Eating Organic – Glyphosate Levels Drop 70%

Credit: Sustainable Pulse

A peer-reviewed study published in the journal Environmental Research found that levels of the pesticide glyphosate in participants’ bodies dropped an average of 70% after six days on an organic diet. The study is one of the first to examine how an organic diet affects exposure to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Bayer’s weedkiller Roundup, the most widely used weedkiller worldwide. It also indicates that for the general population, the food they eat is a primary way they are exposed to this pesticide.

 

“It’s striking that levels of this toxic pesticide dropped so dramatically after less than a week. Given our results and related studies on how an organic diet rapidly reduces pesticide exposure, we could expect to see similar reductions in glyphosate levels in most Americans if they switched to an organic diet,” said study co-author Kendra Klein, PhD, senior staff scientist at Friends of the Earth. “That’s the good news. The bad news is that most of us are eating glyphosate-laden food continuously, resulting in daily doses of the chemical from breakfast through dinner.”

Austrian Parliament votes to fully ban the controversial herbicide Glyphosate

Austrian parliament

Lawmakers in Austria’s lower house of parliament voted to ban all uses of controversial herbicide glyphosate on Tuesday, as the substance faces a slew of lawsuits in the US for potentially causing cancer.

“The scientific evidence of the plant poison’s carcinogenic effect is increasing,” the assembly’s top social democrat, Pamela Rendi-Wagner, said in a statement.

“It is our responsibility to ban this poison from our environment,” she added.

Glyphosate was originally developed by chemical giant Monsanto, a US company that became a subsidiary of Germany’s Bayer last year. The herbicide first appeared on the market under the name of Roundup in 1974. The patent for it has since expired and various companies now produce glyphosate-based weedkillers under different names.

For further information……click on full article link. 

Credit: Sustainable Pulse (image: DW)

Full article: hhttps://sustainablepulse.com/2019/07/04/austrian-parliament-votes-to-ban-glyphosate-weedkiller/#.XScAJehKhPY

First signs of glyphosate weed resistance detected in the UK

The first cases of weed resistance to glyphosate are being detected in the UK, prompting researchers to call for strict stewardship of the world’s best-selling herbicide.

Scientists from Rothamsted Research and crop consultant Adas said some UK populations of the troublesome grassweed sterile brome have reduced glyphosate sensitivity and are in the process of evolving resistance.

They added that this is the first reported case of reduced glyphosate sensitivity in sterile brome worldwide, as well as the first signs of glyphosate resistance being seen in any UK weed species.

The team of researchers – Laura Davies from Adas and Richard Hull, Stephen Moss and Paul Neve from Rothamsted – looked at sterile brome in areas including Rutland, Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire and published their results in the Weed Science Society of America, 2018 journal.

“We believe these results are a timely reminder of the risks associated with increased glyphosate use, providing an early indication of the need for stewardship of glyphosate use,” said the authors.

Worldwide picture

Glyphosate resistance has been reported in 41 species in 29 countries, mostly with genetically modified crops with tolerance to glyphosate or when used in orchards and vineyards where the selection pressure is high.

The UK was thought to be at lower risk from glyphosate resistance as its use is often in tandem with other herbicides, but the use of glyphosate – first introduced in 1974 – has increased and in 2016 some 2.7m hectares of arable land were treated.

Sterile brome, also known as poverty brome or barren brome, has become a problematic weed in the UK due to the popularity of minimum tillage, the rise in winter cereal cropping and lack of effective herbicides.

Conclusion

The researchers concluded that two sterile brome populations in Rutland and Oxfordshire showed a significant reduction in glyphosate sensitivity, and it was highly likely one further population had reduced glyphosate selection pressure in a UK field situation.

The three all showed incomplete control of the grassweed species at the recommended field rate of glyphosate (540g/ha). The herbicide is sold under the brand name Roundup and other generic versions.

The responses to glyphosate of these three populations are comparable to the first reported cases of glyphosate resistance in rigid ryegrass in continental European arable cropping and similar to the first reported cases of glyphosate resistance in Australia, said the authors.

The report is entitled “The first cases of evolving glyphosate resistance in UK poverty brome (Bromus sterilis) populations” and is published in the Weed Science Society of America, 2018.

Credit: Farmers Weekly

Full article: https://www.fwi.co.uk/arable/weeds/first-signs-of-glyphosate-weed-resistance-detected-in-the-uk

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